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Year in Review: DPI’s Dr. Peggy Sieburth visits South Africa

December 27, 2013

Most Citrus-producing countries were represented at the meeting of the International Organization of Citrus Virologists in South Africa. Dr. Peggy Sieburth, Bureau of Citrus Budwood Registration, DPI, presented two talks, one on grafting and another on the use of PCR to detect citrus pathogens.

Most Citrus-producing countries were represented at the meeting of the International Organization of Citrus Virologists in South Africa. Dr. Peggy Sieburth, Bureau of Citrus Budwood Registration, DPI, presented two talks, one on grafting and another on the use of PCR to detect citrus pathogens.

DPI Scientist addresses meeting of citrus virologists in South Africa

In July, Dr. Peggy Sieburth, Biological Scientist IV in the Bureau of Citrus Budwood Registration, attended the meeting of the International Organization of Citrus Virologists in South Africa. She presented two talks on improvements in shoot-tip grafting and real-time PCR for detection of citrus pathogens. Both talks generated much enthusiasm. She also participated in an extra session to discuss whether too many pathogens or other helpful microorganisms are removed from citrus during shoot-tip grafting.

Dr. Peggy Sieburth photographed this white rhino with oxpecker bird from an open jeep in Kruger National Park in South African during an international conference of virologists there.

Dr. Peggy Sieburth photographed this white rhino with an oxpecker bird from an open jeep in Kruger National Park in South African during an international conference of virologists there.

She was also asked to review the South African certification program. Because the five-day meeting was held inside Kruger National Park, one of the challenges she faced was walking to the conference center amidst monkeys and past leopards, crocodiles and hippos on the other side of a fence. She toured citrus production regions and was encouraged when she saw healthy groves in a valley where citrus had once been wiped out by African greening.

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