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Africanized Honey Bees . . . Still Around, Stay Alert

May 19, 2016

AHHE0002 Africanized bee

An African Bee

Sweet Honey Bees Arrive in the U.S.

Honey bees brought to the U.S. in the 1600s by European settlers soon became one of the most economically beneficial insects due to their contributions as a top tier pollinator. Their gentle nature made them easy to manage, and the sweetness they produced made them a favorite in the kitchen

Not So Sweet Honey Bees Introduced

In 1956, a researcher in Brazil imported honey bees from Africa in an attempt to create a honey bee that would be better suited to tropical conditions. The African honey bees were bred with European honey bees. Researchers expected that when mated with the gentle European honey bees, the African honey bees would lose their more defensive nature. However, that was not the case, and in 1957, 26 African queen bees escaped from a breeding program in Sao Paulo, Brazil. The hybrid Africanized honey bees (AHB) became established and expanded their range through South and Central America. The first report of Africanized honey bees in the United States was made in Hidalgo, Texas in 1990. Since then, they have been found throughout the southern U.S.

Department’s Mission is in Part to Protect the Apiary Industry

AHHE0004_regular_honey_bee_left_compared_to_Africanized_bee_right

On the left is European honey bee and the right is an African honey bee

Recognizing the importance of honey bees to Florida agriculture, the Department established an apiary (honey bee) inspection program in 1923 within our Division of Plant Industry. Part of the inspection program involves maintaining 500 bait traps around the state to monitor for unwanted honey bee species.

Africanized Honey Bees Arrive in Florida

In the early 2000s, Africanized honey bees were first detected in Florida and several stinging incidences occurred. The Department continues to work with others to address increasing concerns related to the establishment of AHB, while at the same time stressing the importance and beneficial aspects of managed honey bee colonies. The message needs to be a balanced one: support the beekeeping industry because their efforts put food on our tables and plants and flowers in our landscape, but also be prepared to respond to potential stinging insects such as the Africanized honey bee.

What Does the AHB Look Like and How Do They Act?

The short answer is just like a European honey bee. Africanized honey bees are 10% smaller than EHBs, but most people won’t take the time to measure! Africanized honey bees have very different personalities. They are overly defensive and will attack more readily than that of the EHB.

How to Avoid Being Stung

The African honey bees build their colonies in many places around homes, businesses and in the wild. You may find them in your barbeque grill, an empty flower pot, an utility box, a discarded tire, up in a tree or under a building eave. They tend to react when they are disturbed by moving their nest or even by loud noises and vibrations cause by machinery such as lawnmowers or leaf blowers.  When one or two AHB go out to investigate and sense danger, they use pheromones to alert others of a possible attacker. These pheromones can call thousands of AHB to attack. Things to do if you are attacked by an AHB include:

  • Don’t swat them! Remember the more pheromones, the more bees, the more stings.
  • If bees begin to chase you, run away in a straight line, cover your face, particularly your nose and mouth, and get inside a building or vehicle. Even if a few get in with you, it is better than remaining outside where there is a greater potential for a larger numbers of bees and stings.
  • Remove the stinger by scraping it out with a fingernail or credit card; squeezing the stringer will release more venom.
  • Seek medical attention if you are stung several times, or you are allergic to bee stings.

If you are concerned about a hive or swarm near you please contact a licensed pest control company for removal. For more information please visit our website at FreshFromFlorida.com

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One Response to “Africanized Honey Bees . . . Still Around, Stay Alert”


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